Bell 407 Exterior and Interior View


Bell 407 Exterior and Interior View: a how to look at the 407 featuring videos, images and other media.

Bell 407 Exterior

The Bell 407 is a four-blade, single-engine, civil utility helicopter; a derivative of the Bell 206L-4 LongRanger. The Bell 407 features a Rolls-Royce/Allison 250-C47 turboshaft engine, upgraded transmission, rotor system and flight controls. It has the four-blade main rotor developed for the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior instead of the two blade rotor used on the LongRanger. This upgrade also improved cruise performance over the 206L-4, allowing for faster cruise speeds (137 knots) and greater payloads than earlier models. The new rotor system increased hot/high performance as well. First flight of the two prototype aircraft was achieved in June 1996 with FAA certification granted in December 1996 and first customer deliveries beginning in March 1997.

The Bell 407 is a four-blade, single engine, civil utility helicopter; a derivative of the Bell 206L-4 LongRanger. The 407 uses the four-blade, soft-in-plane design rotor with composite blade technology from the 206L-4. The 407’s airframe is a development of the LongRanger’s airframe. The larger airframe includes:

• A redesigned tailboom

• New structural design to accommodate a 4-bladed rotor system

• Main rotor mast and hub made of corrosion resistant composite materials

• Fenestron tail rotor in place of conventional tail rotor

• An upgraded transmission with increased horsepower capability and improved cooling systems

An option on the aircraft is a 4 axis autopilot which gives the pilot automatic stabilization along with altitude hold, course hold and heading hold modes. A high skid landing gear option is available for operations in unprepared or remote areas.

The Bell 407 is a four-blade, single-engine, civil utility helicopter; a derivative of the Bell 206L-4 LongRanger. The 407 uses the four-blade bearingless, hingeless rotor system, and the dynamic components are similar to the Bell 206L-4. The helicopter also includes a tail rotor camera as standard equipment, and features a digital automatic flight control system that has dual digital flight control computers.

The 407 was certificated by Transport Canada in March 1996 and by the FAA in June 1996.

The first 407 prototype flew on June 29, 1995 in Mirabel, Quebec. On December 22, 1995 the second prototype performed its maiden flight.

The third prototype performed its first flight on January 31, 1996 and on 30 March 1996 it set a new speed record during an FAA certification test program when it achieved a top speed of 185 knots (343 km/h) at sea level.

On April 2, 1996 the fourth prototype conducted its first flight performing stalls with full ice protection systems enabled reaching a hover ceiling of 10,500 ft (3200 m). On May 8, 1996 the 407 received US FAA certification.

In November 2004 a Bell 407 set the world record for landing on the highest helipad in history when

The Bell 407 is a four-blade, single-engine, civil utility helicopter; it is a derivative of the Bell 206L-4 LongRanger. The 407 uses the dynamic components (main rotor blades and tail rotor) and the improved transmission of the 206L-3. In addition, the 407 features a bearingless, hingeless main rotor system with elastomeric rotor head dampers to reduce pilot workload.

The “407” is an FAA Type Certificate designation for Bell’s model 407. The 407 features a Rolls-Royce/Allison 250-C47 turboshaft engine with a digital electronic engine control providing high power to weight ratio for hot and high operations.

The 407 has seating for four in its standard configuration and is powered by an Allison 250-C47 turboshaft engine with a digital electronic control unit (ECU) for improved power management and increased performance in “hot and high” conditions. It was first flown on June 21, 1996, received its type certification on November 30, 1996, and was first delivered to customers in February 1997.

The Bell 407 is a four-blade, single-engine, civil utility helicopter; a derivative of the Bell 206L-4 LongRanger. The 407 uses the four-blade bearingless composite main rotor developed for the United States Army’s OH-58D Kiowa Warrior rather than the semi-rigid two-blade rotor used on the 206B.

The Bell 407 is a four-blade, single-engine, civil utility helicopter; a derivative of the Bell 206L-4 Long Ranger. The 407 uses the four-blade composite main rotor and the upgraded dynamic system developed for the US Army’s OH-58D Kiowa Warrior instead of the two-blade tail rotor used on the Bell 206. Other differences include a retractable tricycle landing gear, an engine speed increasing from 1,800 to 2,040 rpm, and a new transmission allowing for an increase in Maximum Gross Weight (MGW) from 2,850 to 3,000 lb (1,290 to 1,360 kg). A Garmin G1000 glass cockpit was introduced with the Bell 427.

The 407 was announced in October 1994 as the Eagle 407 HP. This followed an agreement on marketing cooperation between Bell Helicopter Textron and Agusta (now AgustaWestland). The initial 407 prototype first flew on June 29, 1995. In 1997 production of the Eagle 407 HP ended without any orders having been placed and no aircraft were actually produced.

In 1996 Bell developed three new prototypes based on Eagle 407HP using their own main rotor system and tail rotor. These new models were designated as the Bell 407AH, Bell 427 and Bell 429

Bell 407. The Bell 407 features advanced drive system technology and rotor blade innovations to offer an aircraft that sets the standard in performance, reliability and ease of use. This light single-engine helicopter has the capacity for a pilot, co-pilot and five passengers with the option of a 6th seat in the cockpit. The Bell 407 boasts a payload capacity of 1,543 kg (3,400 lb) including fuel, which is more than sufficient for its intended mission uses.

The Bell 407 also includes a 4-blade titanium rotor system that provides greater altitude performance, reduced noise levels and enhanced safety margins over existing 3-blade systems on light twin engine helicopters. Its high speed capability makes it an attractive choice for emergency medical service (EMS) missions.

The Bell 407 can fly at speeds of over 200 km/h (108 kt), while still maintaining excellent hot and high hover performance. It is powered by a Rolls Royce 250-C47B turbine engine rated at 732 shp (545kW). The 407 helicopter is equipped with a fully integrated glass cockpit with digital avionics and dual controls for both the pilot and co-pilot.


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