nrt airport…great for people who love travel


Narita Airport (成田空港, Narita Kūkō?) (IATA: NRT, ICAO: RJAA), also known as Tokyo Narita Airport, is the primary international airport serving the Greater Tokyo Area of Japan. It is located approximately 60 kilometres (37 mi) east of central Tokyo in Chiba Prefecture, adjacent to the cities of Narita and Shibayama.

Narita handles the majority of international passenger traffic to and from Japan, and is also a major connecting point for air traffic between Asia and the Americas. It is Japan’s second-busiest passenger airport, handling around 70 percent of its international traffic and 45 percent of its domestic traffic. It is the primary hub of Japan Airlines (JAL), All Nippon Airways (ANA), Nippon Cargo Airlines (NCA), Skynet Asia Airways, and Nippon Airways (ANA) Wings.

As of 2015, Narita was the second-busiest passenger airport in Asia by number of passengers behind Hong Kong International Airport but ahead of Incheon International Airport,[4] and the 15th-busiest in the world handling over 36 million passengers annually.[5] The airport serves as a hub for Air Do,

Narita International Airport serves Tokyo and the surrounding prefectures. It is the main international hub for Japan’s flag carrier All Nippon Airways, as well as low-cost carriers Jetstar Japan, Vanilla Air, Peach and Skymark Airlines. Its IATA airport code, NRT, is taken from the nearby city of Narita. Narita handles the majority of international passenger traffic to and from Japan and is also a major connecting point for air traffic between Asia and the Americas. It is the second busiest passenger airport in Japan (after Haneda Airport), handling around 60% of Japan’s international passenger traffic. It is also the second busiest single-runway airport in the world with over 400 landings and takeoffs per day (after London Gatwick Airport), serving a total of 31 international carriers by 2011.

It took over most international traffic to Tokyo in 1978 when the Tokyo International Airport (more commonly known as Haneda Airport) in Ōta was closed down and turned into a domestic airport. Since its opening in 1978, Narita has been one of the world’s busiest airports, along with Frankfurt Airport and Paris–Charles de Gaulle Airport. In 2013, Narita handled 35,766,426 passengers on 2,549 flights daily to 197

Narita International Airport is the largest airport in Japan and serves the Greater Tokyo Area of Japan. Narita is also known as Tokyo-Narita and is about 60 km east of central Tokyo. Narita handles the majority of international passenger traffic to and from Japan, and is also a major connecting point for air traffic between Asia, North America and Europe.

In 2006, nearly 30 million passengers used the airport. It is a major hub for All Nippon Airways, Japan Airlines, Nippon Cargo Airlines, FedEx Express, and Air China. The airport is owned by Transport Ministry and operated by Narita International Airport Corporation (NAA).

Narita officially opened as a commercial airport on 20 March 1978 with facilities to handle 35 million passengers per year following a decade of construction that was delayed by local opposition. Although the official opening was in 1978, operations began at Narita on 28 March 1978 when an ANA DC-10 flight took off from the airport bound for Honolulu.

The airport has two terminals: Terminal 1 and Terminal 2. Terminal 1 has four satellite concourses A1 through A4 connected to the main terminal building via underground walkways or shuttle bus services. Terminal 2 has two satellite concourses C1 through C3 connected to the main terminal building

Narita International Airport, also known as Tokyo Narita Airport, formerly and originally known as New Tokyo International Airport (新東京国際空港, Shin Tōkyō Kokusai Kūkō) is an international airport serving the Greater Tokyo Area of Japan. It is located approximately 60 kilometres (37 mi) east of central Tokyo in Narita, Chiba. It is the primary international airport in Japan, handling around 45 percent of the country’s international passenger traffic and 60 percent of its international air cargo traffic. As of 2013, Narita was the second-busiest passenger airport in Japan (after Haneda Airport), and was the 11th-busiest air freight hub in the world.[3]

Its main runway shares the record for longest runway in Japan with the second runway at Kansai International Airport in Osaka.

Narita serves as the main international hub of Japan Airlines (Terminal 1), All Nippon Airways (Terminal 2) and Nippon Cargo Airlines, and also serves as an Asian hub for Delta Air Lines and United Airlines. Prior to the opening of Narita Airport, Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) was the main international airport in Japan.

Narita Airport is the first airport in Japan to attain ISO 9002 certification, an international standard for quality assurance. Moreover, it has received the Japan Quality Assurance (JQA) stamp of approval. The airport’s efforts to maintain safety and provide high-quality services have also been recognized by the aviation industry in Japan, where Narita was awarded the Aviation Quality Award for four consecutive years from 1999 to 2002.

For travelers, Narita Airport is a convenient gateway to many destinations around the world. The terminal is well equipped with a wide range of shops and restaurants, providing passengers with many opportunities to relax and enjoy themselves before their journey begins or after it ends.

Narita Airport has been the gateway to Japan since 1981, when it opened to replace the overcrowded facilities at Haneda Airport.

Today, even with Haneda Airport open for international flights, Narita continues to handle more than half of Japan’s international air traffic, and is the 4th-busiest airport in the country.

The airport is divided into three terminals: Terminal 1 for full-service airlines, Terminal 2 for low-cost carriers and Terminal 3 for chartered flights. The terminals are connected by a free shuttle bus that runs every 5 minutes.

Narita Airport is located 70 km east of Tokyo and can be conveniently accessed from the city center by train or bus. Trains from Tokyo Station take between 50 and 100 minutes to reach the airport depending on which service you choose.

This was an amazing trip, no doubt, and one that I shall not soon forget. The only problem was that in the end I didn’t learn as much as I would have liked to about the country and its people. That was mainly because most of the time I spent there was on a plane or in an airport.

I had heard that Tokyo’s Narita International Airport was big and clean and spiffy and modern, but it turned out to be so much more than that. Narita is a city unto itself, a great big bustling metropolis of people and planes, shops and restaurants, all open 24 hours a day. Travelers from all over Asia come there to eat and get their visas stamped; others just hang around for days at a time, killing time until their connecting flights. And no wonder: With its museums and botanical gardens, swimming pools, tennis courts, movie theaters, massage parlors, Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines–not to mention the four-star hotels–Narita is truly a cultural oasis in the desert of international travel.

Some people might complain about the duty-free prices; they are indeed very high. But if you’re just looking to pass some time while waiting for your flight to begin boarding


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